Roof Cleaning Guide

A Guide to roof cleaning products and contractors

Choosing a Roof Cleaning Contractor

Written By: Neal - Jul• 03•11

So you’ve finally got tired of seeing the black roof stains grow and grow and grow on your roof. You’ve done your research and learned it’s not jet fuel or pollution and that you don’t need a new roof. You’ve also learned that the expensive DIY roof cleaning products don’t work by researching on the internet.

Congratulations!  You are in a select group of homeowners that have avoided the costly learning curve of removing the black roof stains from your home. The number one problem in this relatively new industry is education. Many roofing contractors and product sales company’s are taking advantage of uneducated homeowners, costing them hundreds of dollars in useless or sometimes damaging chemicals or in extreme cases, thousands of dollars in unneeded roof replacements.

You’ve come a long way and avoided the gimmick products and the unscrupulous roofer preying on the uninformed. You are out of the woods, into the light and your wallet is safe…right?

Wrong!

There are several pitfalls yet to avoid in order to get those ugly black roof stains cleaned from your home. There are three types of roof cleaning contractors you should avoid. There are company’s that will (believe it or not) actually pressure wash your roof with equipment that would rip up your wooden deck. Just imagine what it does to your shingles. There are also company’s that have signed on with the useless or damaging gimmick cleaners that use the smoke and mirrors of “Low Pressure” to pacify your concerns of damage. Knowing that their gimmick cleaning chemical doesn’t work, they claim and maybe even demonstrate their fancy water broom or special surface cleaner. They might even show you how low their pressure is. Here’s the catch, no amount of water pressure stronger than your water hose is safe and when they are up on your roof, they will use whatever pressure they need to get finished and get to the next scheduled job. Your roof is a secondary concern to their schedule. Most importantly, both of these two groups of contractors would void your roof warranty. The last type is the part timer who might or might not be doing the cleaning properly but has no insurance, no website and should their be an issue or problem, they can disappear as fast as they appeared on the roof cleaning scene.

Here are a few tips when you have decided to solicit bids on getting your roof cleaned.

  • Look for an established roof cleaning company. Google “roof cleaning (your city)” The search engines will generally locate the most popular companies at the top of the page.
  • Visit their website. An established roof cleaning company will have it’s own domain and not some 5 minute directory listing.
  • Call and ask them questions. Do they use pressure washers to clean the roof? Will the roof be clean when they are finished “that day”. Ask them to explain their process.
  • Are they insured?

Not all roof cleaning contractors need to visit your home to provide you with an estimate. Some of the more experienced and established companies can provide you with an estimate using mobile devices to view your home while discussing it with you over the phone. If the contractor does require a visit to provide the estimate, take that opportunity to view his equipment. Most professional contractors will be in a truck or pulling a fully equipped trailer with company logo’s.

As for the costs of a roof cleaning,  while most contractors won’t offer a flat rate due to the unique issues that vary from home to home,  most homes fall into a range of $325 to $700 depending on the size. If you own a average sized home (According to the National Association of Home Builders, the average home size in the United States was 2,700 square feet in 2009) and you have received a price exceeding $1000 you probably need to get additional bids.

To find a roof cleaning pro, visit Roof Cleaning Contractors

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